Saturday, March 14, 2015

BCDC Hearing: Help Preserve Sand Flow to Ocean Beach

Sand is essential to the fine surf we enjoy at Ocean Beach

Greetings Surfriders and Friends,

As many of you know, sand coming out of our rivers and estuaries helps maintain our beaches and slows coastal erosion.  Because we have dammed our rivers, built levees and mined gravel over the last 150 plus years, the amount of sand flowing out of SF Bay is significantly less than it used to be. At some level, this effects erosion at Ocean Beach.  

SF Baykeeper has been the lead environmental group fighting to restrict sand mining in SF Bay. Presently, four companies are looking to gain permits that would drastically increase SF Bay sand mining.  If you are available, please attend/speak out against the permits at the BCDC hearing this Thursday March 19 at 1pm.  Email us at erosionob@gmail.com to coordinate.

The meeting location is the 2nd Floor of the Ferry Building, downtown San Francisco.

Our message: These permits will lead to a signifiant decrease in sand flow out to our beaches, thus spurring coastal erosion.  The USGS Paper cited in the press release link below backs up this claim:


Here's the meeting notice:

Here's more information from SF Baykeeper:

Thanks for checking in...

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Restore Sharp Park Check-In

This protective berm threatens the beach at Sharp Park.


Greetings Surfriders and Friends,

While we await new developments at Sloat, we thought this would be a good time to check in on the effort to Restore Sharp Park.

To recap, the campaign at Sharp Park involves a seawall like structure located on the beach in Pacifica. See photo above.  The rock and dirt berm protects a golf course from flooding when high surf washes ashore.

Just like at Sloat, the beach at Sharp Park is gradually eroding.  This means either the berm is removed or the beach will eventually become submerged. Much of Pacifica's beaches are already lost due to seawalls and rock revetments.

During February's lone winter storm, the golf course experienced major flooding.  This comes on the heels of zero inches of rainfall in January.  Clearly. the City is fighting an uphill battle in trying to safeguard a golf course on this land. Surfrider continues to support the proposal to abandon golf at Sharp Park and to bring this property into the GGNRA system.  By restoring the wetland system, we can remove the seawall and best preserve the beach.

Wild Equity is running a new letter writing campaign to SF Mayor Ed Lee. Please ask him to remove the berm and to restore the Sharp Park wetland and beach. Here's the link http://wildequity.org/alerts/257

One last thing...  Over a year ago, golf course management attempted to reinforce the seawall with more rock - all under the banner of "maintenance." As we reported in a prior post, the appropriate authorities were alerted, which stopped the work from completion. To finish the project legally, SF Rec. and Park was supposed to file for a permit/or permit exemption by last July.  The deadline past without a submission. We will continue to monitor the situation.

Thanks for checking in!

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

New Sand Access at 2nd Lot

The new sand dune at 2nd parking lot

Greetings Sloat Restorationists,

The sand replenishment work at the south parking lot is complete. According to SFPUC 30,000 cubic yards of sand were used at a cost of $400,000.  Work to stabilize the sand from the wind is slated to occur in the near future.

The Surfrider Foundation would like to emphasize that the current project is not the long term, sustainable solution for Sloat area erosion.  That plan is currently under design by the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research (SPUR)’s Ocean Beach Master Plan.

However, the action will bring important benefits.  Chiefly, the sand will create temporary safe access to the beach for the southern parking lot.  Presently, the only way to get to the beach at the south lot is to scale down an eroding mixture of rock and concrete debris.  Temporary improvements such as this are welcome since it will be several years until a long term sustainable plan can be constructed.  

Thursday, December 18, 2014

New: Computer Graphic Showing Long Term Plan / Sand Management Details



Greetings Surfriders and Friends,

An excellent new video has been released from SPUR illustrating the long term project as outlined in the Ocean Beach Master Plan.  The simple graphic sequence shows the typical or present day condition at Sloat.Then, it follows the different steps of implementation (including the sand management work). Please note the protection device for the Lake Merced Tunnel (LMT).  It is designed to allow natural processes - such as erosion and accretion - to take place. If built, it would function similar to the one at Taraval Street, which remains buried most of the time.

There is no doubt that this plan is more environmentally sound than a conventional seawall and rock revetment. However, Surfrider urges the Master Plan team to consider relocating the LMT altogether. With the threat of sea level rise and climate change driven storms, it may be more cost effective and beneficial to the public to move this piece of infrastructure inland. The option should at least be formally studied.

Finally, if you are curious about the details of the current sand management project, here is the technical data sheet.

Happy Holidays!

Monday, December 1, 2014

Sand Project Has Begun for South Parking Lot

The sand management project has begun. Photo: B. McLaughlin 12/1/14


GREAT HIGHWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES WILL BE CLOSED FOR SAND MANAGEMENT PROJECT
.  
BEACH ACCESS TO BE RESTORED SOUTH OF SLOAT

The San Francisco Chapter of the Surfrider Foundation is pleased to announce that the long awaited project to bring sand to Sloat’s southern parking lot has begun.

The National Park Service (NPS), in cooperation with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC), is presently conducting a sand management project at Ocean Beach. Like the 2012 effort, excess sand in front of the O'Shaughnessy Seawall at North Ocean Beach is being excavated and then transported to the beach at the erosion hotspot south of Sloat Boulevard.  In contrast to 2012, the sand this time will be brought to the southern parking lot. 

The Surfrider Foundation would like to emphasize that the current project is not the long term, sustainable fix for Sloat area erosion.  That plan is currently under design by the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research  (SPUR)’s Ocean Beach Master Plan. However, the action will bring important benefits.  Chiefly, the sand will create safe access to the beach for the southern parking lot.  Presently, the only way to get to the beach at the south lot is to scale down an eroding mixture of rock and concrete debris.

In 2012, according to the National Park Service website, approximately 73 thousand cubic yards of sand was relocated. The current project is slated to transfer approximately 30 thousand cubic yards of sand. The south bound lanes are to be closed Monday through Friday, 8:00 AM to 7:00 PM. The project is scheduled to be completed within five weeks. The cost of the project is $500,000 according to SFPUC.

Friday, November 21, 2014

Ca Coastal Commission and San Francisco's Local Coastal Program

A smooth gray line peels off at Sloat's south lot. (photo B. McLaughlin)


Greetings Surfriders and Friends,

Unfortunately, the new sand back-passing project for Sloat continues to be delayed. Over the last month, we have made phone calls to our contact at the PUC. Apparently there was a permit issue that is responsible. The good news is that the equipment is in place at Sloat south lot and ready to go. We will update with photos when the project is complete.

In other news, the chapter attended the California Coastal Commission meeting in Half Moon Bay on Wednesday November 12. At the hearing, Surfrider registered support for San Francisco's grant application to update their coastal planning document (also known as the Local Coastal Program or LCP). With an updated LCP, the restoration work for Sloat can move forward in a more efficient manner. Without a current LCP, individual permits for each piece of the restoration might have been needed from the commission.  Securing just one permit can be very time consuming. A revised LCP will help expedite the restoration process as well as ensure the final Sloat design is compliant with the threat of sea level rise and climate change driven storms. We believe these latter two elements will help promote the managed retreat strategy we have long been seeking. Thanks for checking in!

Sunday, October 5, 2014

October offshores grace the 2nd parking lot. (photo: B. McLaughlin)

Greetings Surfriders and Friends,

By all accounts, the two public meetings went well, though attendance was light.

The good news on the sand project is that the second parking lot will indeed be the focus of the new replenishment work.  Also, because of our advocacy efforts, general improvements for the parking lots are now high up on the list of near term priorities.

If you would like to submit your own comments on these and other issues, please do! The deadlne is October 15.  Below is a pasted email from SPUR with all the information.  Thanks!






OCEAN BEACH NEWS: SEPTEMBER 2014


Thanks to all of you who stopped by our open space design workshop at the United Irish Cultural Center this week (9/24)! For those who didn’t make it or who want to refresh your memory, you can view the presentation boards via the link to the blog post below. These boards present information on proposed open space designs at both the North Reach, across from Golden Gate Park between Lincoln Way and Balboa Street, and the South Reach, along the Great Highway from Sloat to Skyline Blvd. Please take a look at the boards and download the attached feedback form to submit your comments to us by October 15, 2014:
via email at oceanbeach@spur.org, or
via mail: Ben Grant, SPUR, 654 Mission St, San Francisco, CA 94105.


​​Your feedback will be incorporated and presented an evening forum at SPUR (654 Mission) on October 27. Once again thank you all for your interest and participation!


Best regards,

Ben Grant and Shannon Fiala
SPUR OCEAN BEACH NEWS



Give Us Feedback on Open Space Design for Ocean Beach!





Thanks to all of you who stopped by our open space design workshop at the United Irish Cultural Center last night (9/24)! Please take a look at the boards posted (and attached) below and submit your feedback to us by October 15, 2014.

SPUR OCEAN BEACH EVENTS



Open Space Design at Ocean Beach


San Francisco


6:00 p.m. | Monday, October 27, 2014


Read full event details >>
OTHER NEWS


Submit Comment on the Ocean Beach Sand Management Project


The Ocean Beach Sand Management Project will gather excess sand built up along the O’Shaughnessy Seawall and place this sand in the erosion hotspot south of Sloat Boulevard. To address the issues of excess sand and sand deficit at opposite ends of Ocean Beach, the National Park Service (NPS) in cooperation with the City’s two departments, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) and Department of Public Works (DPW) propose to transport approximately 30,000 cubic yards (cy) of sand from the overwidened backbeach area in front of the O’Shaughnessy Seawall to the erosion hot spot south of Sloat Boulevard to provide temporary shoreline stabilization and protection for the Lake Merced Transport Tunnel, which connects to a large wastewater treatment facility, as well as the Great Highway. Submit comment here by September 26, 2014.


SPUR

Ideas and action for a better city





654 Mission St.

San Francisco, CA 94105

415.781.8726

info@spur.org


76 South First Street

San Jose, CA 95113

408.638.0083

infosj@spur.org



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